Christians at the Peace Camp

Dear blog reader

Hopefully you will forgive me for a blog post on something at Shandon of particular to interest to me, but sometimes slightly controversial – the peace camp.

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LENNOX HERALD, NOVEMBER 17, 1989

CHRISTIAN PROTEST AT FASLANE BASE BY MARY CULLEN, PICTURES BY BRIAN AVERELL

Members of Christian CND from all over Britain held a Sunday service with a difference at the weekend.

They gathered in bright sunshine and showers at the gates of Faslane to pray for peace and voice their opposition to Trident submarines.

Members of Christian CND carry their banners for peace.

The service was the final act if Christian CND’s annual conference held in Glasgow this year for the first time.

The Faslane visit, by three coachloads of Christian peace activists from as far away as Wales and the south of England, began with a tour of the base which took in Coulport and the new Glen Fruin road as well as a visit to the peace camp at the south gate of Faslane.

Members of the peace camp acted as unofficial guides – an irony not lost on many of them following recent claims that it could be putting tourists off the area.

Many of the visitors were visibly shaken by the sheer size of developments at Faslane ad Coulport, designed to take Trident submarines in the 1990s.

And they were struck by the environmental impact on the countryside around Loch Long and the Gare Loch.

Sister Moira Colette Rudden, a Dominican nun from Canterbury who is also a vice-chairperson of Christian CND said ‘It seems to me that the heart has been gouged out of the hills around Coulport.’

‘I have visited all the bases in the south of England but I have never seen anything like this.’

The face of protest – Dominican Sister Moira Colette looks back towards Faslane from the peace camp at Shandon

Sister Moira, who has appeared before magistrates on many occasions for breaking the law during protests at military bases in England, revealed that there has been a significant change of attitude among many religious sisters since the present wave of direct action began.

She said ‘Ten years ago when I was first convicted of breaking the law, members of my own community wouldn’t speak to me for days.’

‘Now I have the support of the vast majority of them and I believe it is important for us to be standing up and protesting against nuclear weapons.’

Shandon Valuation Roll 1935

Dear blog reader

Welcome to the eleventh part in a series, a list of the people, with house names where known, who were connected with Shandon in 1935.

In 1935 Shandon had 87 households listed, an increase compared to the 79 households in 1930.

This compares with: In 1930 Shandon had 79 households listed, a slight increase compared to 1925. In 1925 Shandon had 73 households listed, a slight decrease on 1920. In 1920 Shandon had 76 households listed, a very slight increase on 1915. In 1915 Shandon had 75 households listed, a slight decrease on 1905. In 1905 Shandon had 82 households listed which was a vast increase on the anomaly of the valuation roll of 1895 when  only 16 households were listed but also an increase on the number of households in the 1885 Shandon valuation roll.   In 1885 Shandon had 74 households, a huge increase from 1875 when Shandon had 32 households. The 1875 number was the exact same number as the 32 households in 1865 which had been a growth of 4 households from the 28 households in 1855.

Hopefully those of you with ancestors from Shandon will find this list useful.

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Kirk Brae, Shandon

Ernest Adair, Woodbank Place
Gladys Gray Adams, Balernock
Robert D Allan, Ardgare Cottage
Alexander Beagrie, Woodbank Place
Reverend George Bennett, Manse
William Bissett, Cragmhor Lodge
Mrs Edith Mary Black, Croy
A A Stuart Black, Croy
R Blackadder, Shandon House
William G Blazier, Croy
Charles H Bridge, Wooden [House?]
Andrew Brodie, Hillhead
David Carswell, Shandon House
Thomas Cornwall, North Lodge, Shandon House
Mrs Helen Craig, Woodbank Cottage
George Craig, Woodbank Cottage
William J Day, Woodbank Place
Elsie S Walker Downie, widow, Cragmhor
Mrs Duffie, West Shandon
David Duggan, Woodbank Place
Alexander H Fletcher, Lagbuie
Edwin O Fulton, Letrualt
Miss E A Garden, Eda Yarrow Cottage
James Gibson, Ardchapel Lodge
William Gow, Blairvadach Lodge
Thomas Grieve, House 6 1/2 mile post, Shandon Station
William Grieve, Shandon House
Robert Haggart, Glenfeulan Lodge
Robert Haliburton, Balernock Shore Cottage
John F Henderson, Glenfeulan
Archibald Henderson, Blairvadach
Robert Hill, Lagbuie
Benjamin Hill, bothy, Blairvadach
Barclay Hogarth, Croy
Lieutenant Colonel Duncan Charles Home, Berriedale
William Houston, Hillhead House
George Hughes, Fuinary
George Hunt, West Shandon
John Hutcheson
J Johnstone, Hillhead House
Sydney R Jones, Shandon Bank Cottage
Colonel Henry B Jordon, Bashley
Colonel Henry B Jordon, Woodside Cottage
Archibald H Kedey, Altnacoille
Hubert V Kirkpatrick, Lagbuie
John Crawford Knox, Oakbank
James Little, South Lodge, Shandon House
Miss W MacAdam, Bungalow
William MacArthur, Woodbank Place
M MacDade, West Shandon
Mrs MacDougall, The Gables
John MacGibbon, Coal Depot, Shandon Station
John MacGibbon, Golf Course
Peter Machray, Agnes Millar Wilson House
Colin M MacKellar, Eda Yarrow Lodge
Catherine MacKenzie, Stuckenduff
Margaret C MacKinlay, widow, Woodburn Cottage
Mrs Isabella MacLachlan, Ardgare
Margaret MacLean, South Lodge, West Shandon
George H Torquil MacLeod, Fuinary
William MacNeill, North Lodge, West Shandon
Mrs Margaret M B MacNicol, Ardchapel
Robert S MacNicol, Ardchapel
Miss R W Miller, Hillhead House
Robert Mitchell, Shandon Hydro Hotel, Shandon Station
Robert Mitchell, West Shandon
Robert Mitchell, Poultry Farm, West Shandon
Mrs Mary Mitchell, Bungalow, Carn Moss
Nelson Mitchell, Shandon House
Nelson Mitchell, Grazings, Shandon House
Robert Mitchell, Site of Shed
[Blank] Neilson, West Shandon
John Patterson, House 6 1/2 Mile Post, Shandon Station
Alexander Pottie, The Gables
Roderick Ramage, Bashley
William Rattray, Glenfeulan
John Rodger, Croy
W J Rogers, Woodside Cottage
Robert Ross, The Gables
William Scobie, House 6 3/4 Mile Post, Shandon Station
Henry Scobie, Ardgare Lodge
Ronald G Sillars, Stuckenduff
Ronald G Sillars, Ardgare
Frederick Small, Blairvaddich
Charles Stewart, Letrualt
Mrs Pauline C Taylor, Linnburn
Mrs Mary E Watson, Blairvaddich
William Williamson, Fuinary

Near Miss On Train Tracks

ABERDEEN EVENING EXPRESS, TUESDAY, 1ST AUGUST 1967

TRAIN BAIRN IS ‘SATISFACTORY’

Ten-month-old Elizabeth Agnew who missed death by inches when a double diesel engined train ran over her yesterday is today ‘fairly satisfactory’ in the Vale of Leven Hospital, Dunbartonshire.

Shandon Train Station

She was seen being run over by the engine driver. When he found her later lying crying between the rails near her home at Shandon near Helensburgh she had only minor bruises on her head and arms.

Church Day Out

THE FIFE FREE PRESS, SATURDAY, 21 JUNE 1947

DISTRICT NEWS – EAST WEMYSS

WORK PARTY DRIVE

Members of St George’s Church Ladies’ Work Party and friends, numbering thirty took part in a very enjoyable bus drive to Oban on Monday.

They passed through the picturesque countryside surrounding Lochearnhead, where a brief halt was made. Oban was reached about 1pm and after an excellent lunch a number of the party went for a sail in the bay while other spent the afternoon shop and sightseeing.

On the homeward journey a stop was made at Shandon, where Rev George Bennett, who was in charge of St George’s for almost ten years, is now minister.

Shandon Church

Another halt was made at Balloch and the return journey was completed via Stirling.

YACHT DESTROYED BY FIRE

MILNGAVIE AND BEARSDEN HERALD, 10 JULY 1937

YACHT DESTROYED BY FIRE

Helensburgh Fire Brigade were called out on Wednesday to a fire that had broken out in the motor yacht Maureen, belonging to Mr Eric A Hunter, Bearsden. The yacht was lying moored off Blairvaddick Bay, near Shandon, on the Gareloch.

The Gareloch as seen from Shandon

Those in charge made an effort to beach her, and as the brigade arrived the tanks burst and blew out the deck, scattering burning oil and petrol on the water. The brigade had to bring their motor for close on half a mile along the shore, and the firemen stood in the water up to their waists holding the line of hose.

The cause of fire is not known, and the yacht was completely destroyed. Last Saturday, in the 156 miles race for motor yachts, Maureen was third.

Homicidal Naval Man

EVENING EXPRESS, WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 31, 1951

12 MONTHS FOR CULPABLE HOMICIDE, P.O. NOT VIOLENT MAN

Petty officer William Joseph Bird, of Birmingham, was found guilty of culpable homicide at Glasgow High Court today and was sentenced to twelve months’ imprisonment.

The jury’s verdict was unanimous.

Lord Jamieson, passing sentence, said: ‘I am disposed to take a somewhat lenient view for two reasons, I am satisfied you did not intend taking the life of this woman, and what you did would not have had that effect but for the fact she had a bad heart.

‘I am also taking into consideration the fact that you lay under a charge of murder for some time.’

Bird was charged with having on September 16 on this year on the Rhu Garelochead Road, near to Letrualt Farm, assaulted Annie Johnstone, Hut No 56, Camis Eskin Camp, Helensburgh.

The indictment alleges that he seized her, struck her on the face with his fist, knocked her down and ‘did kill her’.

NOT VIOLENT

A shipmate, Richard Charles Wright, engine room artificer, said that he had known Bird about eight months, and in his opinion he was not a man of violent temper.

Wright said that on the afternoon of September 16 he went ashore with Bird from HMS Jupiter. They went to the fleet canteen and sat drinking from 1.10 to 2.30pm.

They then went to Shandon Hydro, where they stayed from 3 till 4pm.

Shandon Hydro

In the Hydro they had a few more drinks. Bird had £6 10/- in his possession. Bird, according to witness, had had enough to drink.

FOUR PINTS OF BEER

Witness said that Bird had four pints of beer, one or two gins, one double whisky at least, and two other drinks in the three hours between 1 and 4pm.

Another shipmate of accused, Petty Officer Robert William Collvrey (31), agreed that Bird was a mild-tempered man. ‘I have never seen him in a violent temper even in drink’.

The petty officer said that when Bird left the Hydro he was ‘three-quarters drunk’. He had money in his pocket, but the majority of it was in £1 notes.

GOOD CHARACTER

Bird’s commanding officer, Lieut-Commander John William Herbert Miller (30), said that he had known Bird for five months.

He added ‘He is a man of very good character, a good example to junior ratings, and above average efficiency in his job.’

Bird, he said, had been in the navy for thirteen years.

The defence closed without calling Bird to the witness box.

Death of Reverend George Bennett

FIFE FREE PRESS, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1956

EAST WEMYSS DISTRICT NEWS – TRIBUTE TO FORMER MINISTER

Shandon Church

The Rev. Alex. Macrae paid tribute to a former minister of the Church, the Rev. George Bennett, at the morning service in St George’s on Sunday.

Mr Bennett, who died recently, was minister of St George’s from 1916 to 1926 when he accepted a call at Greenock and Shandon, where he served until his retirement, when he took up residence in Glasgow.

Mr Macrae said that Mr Bennett would be remembered by most of the older residents of East Wemyss and especially by this congregation for raising the building fund for the present Church as it was ;largely due to his vision and drive that the scheme was instigated although the Church was not constructed during his ministry.

Mr Bennett, who was laid to rest in East Wemyss Cemetery, is survived by two sons and a daughter. One son is a minister in Glasgow.

Shandon Valuation Roll 1930

Dear blog reader

Welcome to the tenth part in a series, a list of the people, with house names where known, who were connected with Shandon in 1930.

In 1930 Shandon had 79 households listed which is a slight increase compared to 1925.

This compares with: In 1925 Shandon had 73 households listed, a slight decrease on 1920. In 1920 Shandon had 76 households listed, a very slight increase on 1915. In 1915 Shandon had 75 households listed, a slight decrease on 1905. In 1905 Shandon had 82 households listed which was a vast increase on the anomaly of the valuation roll of 1895 when  only 16 households were listed but also an increase on the number of households in the 1885 Shandon valuation roll.   In 1885 Shandon had 74 households, a huge increase from 1875 when Shandon had 32 households. The 1875 number was the exact same number as the 32 households in 1865 which had been a growth of 4 households from the 28 households in 1855.

Hopefully those of you with ancestors from Shandon will find this list useful.

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Agnes L Adams, Balernock
Doctor James A Adams, Balernock
Robert D Allan, Ardgare
William Allan, Croy
John Bain, Shandon House
Reverend George Bennett, manse
William Bissett, Cragmohr
William Black, Ardgare
A A Stuart Black, Croy
– Boland, Bashley
Andrew Brodie, Hillhead House
James Brodie, Woodbank Place
Thomas Brown, West Shandon
Henry Bruce, Hillhead House
James Calder, Ardchapel
Robert Campbell, coal depot, Shandon station
R Campbell, grazings, Shandon House
John Campbell, Gable lodge
David Carswell, Shandon House
Mrs Isabella McL. Cook, Ardgare
Thomas Cornwall, Shandon House
Mrs Helen Craig, shop, Woodbank Place
John Craig, Woodbank Place
Francis Craig, Woodbank Place
Mrs Helen Craig, Woodbank Cottage
George Craig, Woodbank Cottage
Joseph Dick, Blairvaddick
Elsie S Walker Downie, widow, Cragmohr
Thomas Dugan, Woodside
Donald Fraser, Linnburn
Edwin O Fulton, Letrualt
John Fulton, Blairvaddick
Thomas Grieve, Shandon Station
William Grieve, West Shandon
Robert Haliburton, Balernock
James Hannay, Linnburn
John F Henderson, Glenfeulan
Robert Hill, Lagbuie
Benjamin Hill, Blairvaddick
Colonel D C Home, Berriedale
Mrs Hughes, Shandon House
George Hughes, Fuinary
John Hughes
J S Hunt, West Shandon
Colonel Henry B Jordon, Bashley
Colonel Henry B Jordon, Woodside
Archibald H Kedey, Altnacoille
Hubert V Kirkpatrick, Lagbuie
John Knox, Oakbank
Peter Lang, Glenfeulan
William MacArthur, Woodbank Place
John MacGibbon, golf course
Peter Machray, Agnes Millar Wilson house
John MacIntyre, Hillhead House
Colin M McKellar, Broomfield
Catherine MacKenzie, Stuckenduff
Margaret C MacKinlay, widow, Woodburn Cottage
Margaret MacLean, West Shandon
Reverend W H MacLeod, Fuinary
Mrs Margaret W B MacNicol, Ardchapel
John D MacRae, Shandon Bank
Mrs Mary Mitchell, Carn Moss
Nelson Mitchell, Shandon House
Alexander Mitchell, Croy
Peter Paterson, Hillhead House
John Patterson, Shandon Station
David Poole, West Shandon
Alexander Pottie, Gable house
William Rattray, Glenfeulan
D Ross, West Shandon
William Scobie, Shandon Station
Ronald G Sillars, Stuckenduff
Ronald G Sillars, Ardgare
James Simmers, Letrualt
Joseph MacIntyre Taylor, Linnburn
John Turner, Lagbuie
Mary E Watson, Blairvaddick
William Williamson, Fuinary
Etheldreda Yarrow, Broomfield


THE MAGIC OF SHANDON HYDRO

Dear blog reader

I usually don’t share such recent finds but the descriptions are so good in this article I find it worth sharing.

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THE LENNOX HERALD, FEBRUARY 5, 1993

DOWN MEMORY LANE – THE MAGIC OF SHANDON HYDRO – BY PATRICIA DRAYTON

A group of us were discussing the merits of the various hotels and restaurants we had visited over the festive season and one of the party told us of a wonderful Christmas and New Year she and her husband had spent at Shandon Hydro just before the second world war.

The picture she painted made us wish the hotel was still operational.

The Victorian mansion had been built originally for the famous Clyde engineer Robert Napier.

Napier, born in Dumbarton, son of a blacksmith, became a very wealthy man. He founded an engineering company, making engines for the steamships of the day. The engine he build for the paddle steamer Leven is on display in his home town to this day.

Napier had a small summer residence in Shandon, he fell in love with the pretty little village and commissioned John Thomas Rochead to design a permanent home for him there. The result was West Shandon, latterly Shandon Hydro.

The work was completed in 1852, its size and distinctive towers made it a landmark on the Gareloch.

Incorporated in the design of the house was a museum and picture gallery to house Napier’s large collection of valuable antiques and paintings, many by well known artists, Rembrandt, Raphael and others.

Napier spent his retirement happily at West Shandon. He was awarded many honours and decorations during his lifetime, but remained a quiet, modest and unassuming man. He died in 1876 and on his death the house and its treasures were sold.

A firm bought the house for the sum of £38,000, a fortune in those days, and turned it into a hydropathic establishment.

In my postcard collection I have ad advertisement card for Shandon Hydro. One one side it has a photograph of the Hydro and on the other was the following ‘potted history’:

‘Shandon Hydropathic is situated on the shore of the Gareloch (Firth of Clyde) which is considered to be one of the finest health resorts in Scotland. One hour by rail from Glasgow.

Russian, Turkish and salt water swimming baths, private golf course, covered and open tennis courts, course, croquet and bowling greens, boating, cycling etc. Convenient centre for excursions by rail and steamer. Garage.’

The Hydro advert postcard which contained a potted history on the reverse,

I also have a Duplex album of souvenir views of Shandon Hydro which I bought in Macneur and Bryden’s before it closed. This contains 10 views in rich sepia photogravure detachable for use as post cards, with miniature views of each card for future reference. This cost one shilling (5p). One the back of this album is the tariff.

The inclusive terms were as follows: April to September from 18/- per day; October to March from 15/- per day. These terms include bedroom attendance, lights, breakfast, luncheon, afternoon tea, dinner.

Also the enjoyment of baths (private or swimming in baths department), putting green, tennis on covered or open-air hard courts, bowls, croquet, dancing in the hotel ballroom, concerts, entertainments.

Apart from the inclusive tariff quoted above, the general tariff was – Single apartment bedroom 8/6d to 15/-; Double 18/- to 36/-; Single room per day 25/-; Breakfasts: plain 2/6; Table d’Hote 4/-; Table d’Hote luncheon 4/-; Afternoon teas in lounge 1/6; Tea in bedroom 1/-; Table d’Hote dinners 7/6; Dinner and dance 11/6; Meals in bedrooms; extra per meal 1/- per head; Visitors servants: 15/- per day, apartment and board; Garage per week from 12/6 to 17/6, per day 2/- to 3/-, 2 hours of less 1/-; Motor cycles and sidecars 2/- per day; Private lock-up per week £1 2/6, 3/6 per day; Washing cars 2/6 to 5/-.

The luxurious surroundings of the second lounge.
The terrace of the Hydro overlooking the Gareloch.

The Hydro had a small post office just inside the gate, run by a Miss McLean. It also had two lodges.

During the First World War the Navy occupied the Hydro and it reverted to being a hotel again until the outbreak of the Second World War, when the Army moved in and took it over for the duration.

When the war ended it was once again run as an hotel, but the magic had vanished and the venture was not a success. The end of an era came in 1957 when the house was demolished, and only memories remain.

Reverend Neil Brodie Biography

THE EVENING TELEGRAPH, FRIDAY MARCH 18, 1892

DEATH OF A DISRUPTION MINISTER

Reverend Neil Brodie

The death of the Rev. Neil Brodie, emeritus-minister of West Free Church, Pollokshaws, took place last Thursday at Wellpark House, Craigmore, Bute, where he had resided for some time past.

Mr Brodie, who was in is 80th year, was born in Campbeltown, and while there was a school-fellow of the late Norman MacLeod, while in later life he was a personal friend of Hugh Miller. He was educated at Glasgow University, and after passing through the Theological College he entered upon his first charge at Kilmarnock. While there the Disruption took place, and along with his congregation he went over to the Free Church. He was subsequently minister at Shandon, on the Gareloch, and in 1873 he was chosen as minister of the West Free Church at Pollokshaws, the pastorate of which he held until abut eight years ago when, owing to advancing years, he retired.

In private life Mr Brodie was of an exceedingly affectionate nature, and his love for animals and birds in particular was one of his notable traits. Generally he was known for his genial temperament; he was deeply read, and a broad type of theologian. He had been twice married, and leaves a widow, but no family.

Shandon Church